45 years later … we can resurrect a culture of life

norma_mccorvey_jane_roe_1989January 22, 1973 was a day that changed the history of our nation forever, a day that put the stamp of approval on the growing culture of death in our nation, a day that legalized murder. Since that day, roughly 60 million Americans have been aborted. Sixty million! That number should take our breath away! It should convict us of the sin of our nation, of our own sin. It should call us to action.

Before I proceed, I want to stress that I am not condemning those who, out of fear and ignorance, have had abortions or who assisted someone in having an abortion. Yes, that was a sinful act and there needs to be repentance, but like Jesus, I would say, “Neither do I condemn you. Go and sin no more.” (John 8:11)

I also am not faulting anyone who had to terminate a pregnancy due to life-threatening circumstances. I personally had emergency surgery to remove an ectopic pregnancy. I’ll never forget how sorrowful I felt when the doctor told me that my unborn child had a heartbeat, yet I knew that heart would not be beating in a few short hours.

When it comes to elective abortions, the bulk of the guilt lies with those who run the abortion industry, those who promote it, those who legislated it into legality, those who coerce people into that decision, those who flippantly choose to take the lives of unborn children, and those who stand by and do nothing about it, all the while knowing it’s wrong.

Before I became a Christian, I was pro-choice, and I didn’t even particularly like children. However, the day I gave my life to Jesus, God placed a burden on my heart — a love of children, both born and unborn. I began to desire having children of my own, I became a teacher, and I got involved in the front lines of the battle for the sanctity of life. God threw me all in, and I didn’t hesitate. I came to believe that abortion is one of our national sins, and that the church was responsible to intervene. I volunteered, and later took a paid position, at A Woman’s Choice Resource Center in Louisville. I counseled women who thought they might be pregnant, did pregnancy tests, gave supplies to those who were pregnant or who had young children, assisted with adoption plans, drove women to ultrasounds, shared the gospel, helped women who had had abortions to find counseling, and I even sidewalk counseled. I was polite, yet direct, when trying to dissuade women from deciding for abortion.

In our nation today, abortion persists as a stain on the heart of our nation. This practice began as a largely eugenic practice. Here are the words of Margaret Sanger, abortion advocate and Planned Parenthood founder:

” … I wish to take advantage of the present opportunity to point out that the unbalance between the birth rate of the “unfit” and the “fit”, admittedly the greatest present menace to civilization, can never be rectified by the inauguration of a cradle competition between these two classes. In this matter, the example of the inferior classes, the fertility of the feeble-minded, the mentally defective, the poverty-stricken classes, should not be held up for emulation to the mentally and physically fit though less fertile parents of the educated and well-to-do classes. On the contrary, the most urgent problem today is how to limit and discourage the over-fertility of the mentally and physically defective. (Margaret Sanger, “The Eugenic Value of Birth Control Propaganda,” Oct 1921. Published Article. Source: Birth Control Review, Oct. 1921, p. 5 , Margaret Sanger Microfilm S70:913.)

In other words, some people are beneficial to society and others aren’t. Therefore we have a duty to limit the reproduction of the inferior class. This line of thinking stands in stark contrast to our founding fathers’ statement that, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. (U.S. Constitution, paragraph 2).

Margaret Sanger was a racist, with an agenda to eliminate “inferior races.”

“It is said that the aboriginal Australian, the lowest known species of the human family, just a step higher than the chimpanzee in brain development … ” (Sanger, “What Every Girl Should Know” 1920, p. 47. Retrieved from http://www.ukapologetics.net/10/sanger.htm).

Sanger was an associate of Adolf Hitler who sympathized with his ideas on eugenics. She began the American Birth Control League, changing its name to Planned Parenthood during World War II, to cover her ties with Hitler’s philosophy. Though Sanger originally opposed abortion, she changed her stance, and her organization eventually broadened its purposes. (Source: Linda Gordon, ‘Woman’s Body; Woman’s Right’ – Grossman, 1976, p347, Retrieved from http://www.ukapologetics.net/10/sanger.htm).

Here are the words of Dr. Alveda King, granddaughter of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr:

“The killing tools of abortionists are as aimed at blacks today as the fire hoses of segregationists 50 years ago.

Taking more African American lives than gun violence, heart disease, cancer, and AIDS combined, abortion seems to have targeted blacks in a way that can only make remaining Ku Klux Klan members smile. For every three living African Americans, there is one who has been aborted. It’s as if a plague swept through the black community and took every fourth person.” (http://www.priestsforlife.org/africanamerican/abortion-industry-racism.htm)

Abortion and racism are related evils. Both stem from greed and the notion that some people are actually not fully human, and therefore don’t have deserve the same rights and status. They are expendable. Abortion grew out of the idea that there are inferior people, that those who are non-white, disabled, or unproductive are to be eliminated.

However, there is work that can be done to reverse this mindset in our nation. It starts in the Church. The Church must do more to change the culture of death in our country. We must decide once and for all that racism is not to be tolerated — not in our churches, not in our communities, and not in the White House. And we must reach out and love on women and families who find themselves in difficult pregnancies. Though we must speak out against abortion, that alone does little to impact the daily lives of those who are surprised by an unplanned pregnancy and fearful that they can’t handle a child. Furthermore, we must be willing to open our homes to foster and adopt children. Those of us who have extra should be willing to share what we have with the less fortunate. If we were to do these things, in addition to praying and confessing our own sins, God would fulfill His promise to “hear from heaven and heal our land.” (2 Chronicles 7:14).

 

 

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